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Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
and pakistan. we must always be on our guard, but now, i am informed that this figure has been significantly reduced. in pakistan, osama bin laden has been killed and al qaeda is significantly weakens. in afghanistan, british and other forces have driven al qaeda from their bases, and while it is too early to tell for certain, initial evidence shows we have halted the certai suggests we halted the momentum of the talibannsurgency in its heartland. mr. speaker, we are entering a new phase in which the afghan forces will do more of the fighti and patrolling and our forces training and mentoring. as president obama said last month the mission is changing from, that to support. when we arrived there was no one to hand over to. no pper army or police. in many places across the country the afghan security forces now stand ready to begin the process of taking over security responsibility. success in afghanistan requires a number of critical steps. the first is making sure the afghan security forces are able to secure their own territory. there have been well known problems especially with the afgha
aid to pakistan. they're with holding it, expelling military trainers and they hope holidaying back all that money will make pakistan crack down harder on militants and terrorists. what's the best way to describe the relationship with pakistan right now? >> they've been an important ally in the fight on terrorism, they've been the victim of enormous amounts of terrorism, but right now they have taken steps that have given us reason to pause on aid which we have give on the their military and we're trying to work through that. it's a complicated relationship in a difficult part of the world. >>> and here's a figure for you. $37 billion. according to them, that much money could vanish this year from pockets. two out of ten dollars americans took in came in the form of money from government and when those extended benefits go away by the end of the year, some $37 billion onto go into people's accounts and hence won't go into the economy. let e let's go to kristie lu stout for your morning hit from hong kong. christy good morning. >> good morning, ali. >> it begins after hours markets c
in military aid to pakistan, about one-third the annual total according to administration officials. relations between the two countries have been strained especially after the u.s. raid that kill add bin laden. only a short distance from pakistan's leading military academy. the might of those trying to survive the drought hit horn of africa is far outstripping the ability of anyone to help. u.n.'s chief refugee official said today the crisis in somalia alone is the worst humanitarian disaster in the world. to give an idea of the scale he was visiting a refugee camp the size of cleveland. tony guida has more. >> reporter: look into this child's eyes. he knows something you and i will never know, how it feels to be desperately hungry. there are many children like him in this hospital in mogadishu, malnourished children, some close to death, all refugees from the drought and violence destroying somalia. >> if you are a hungry person, somebody once told me it feels as if there is bleach in your belly. it hurts so much. >> bettina luescher speaks for the world food program, the oortion will feed 6
. he says the u.s. has identified 10 to 20 key al qaeda leaders whom he says are in pakistan, yemen and other areas. >>> al qaeda is making a comeback in afghanistan. u.s. commanders are seeing a sudden resurgence just as american troops are getting ready to leave. cnn's nick payton walsh joined an army patrol on the hunt. >> reporter: almost a decade in the hunt for al qaeda in one part of eastern afghanistan looks like this. americans pushing the afghans to the front, taking the high ground in hills impossible to police. the pressure for less americans here is extreme, but the afghans only mustered five men for this patrol. >> it has to be five to seven round bursts and go. >> reporter: and despite this training, policing the local villages, let alone taking on the terrorist network that america came here to eradicate. it is here that afghanistan's future looks like its past. american control does not extend up to this valley and high on the ridgelines, they found safe havens for al qaeda. they have revealed to cnn they located here al qaeda fighters using the secluded alpine vill
bin laden's pakistan hideout in may. in it, u.s. officials say it found documents bin laden wanted to attack the united states on the 10th anniversary of 9/11. plans included including general petraeus and shooting down air force one or the helicopter with a missile or rocket grenade. other documents show bin laden was pushing for a stronger terrorist presence in europe. >>> bp hopes to win become the confidence of federal regulators. it will impose new safety standards at drilling projects in the gulf of mexico. the safety measures exceed federal requirements. bp pledges better supervision and improved drilling practices aimed at preventing blowouts like the one in april of last year. the explosion killed 11 rig workers and released nearly 5 million barrels of crude oil into the gulf. >>> in our economy watch in morning, we're learning more about the takeover deal targeting oakland based clorox. billionaire carl icon announced yesterday he is offering $10.2 billion for the company. however he feels he shouldn't, the only bidder for clorox. he said shop around it get the best deal.
. what was his connection to pakistan? there are so many unanswered questions about his overseas connections and what he was really doing and his radicalization during the process in which the military did nothing. and finally, the information the joint terrorism task force had about mr. al laak can i and communications with major hasan at fort hood. why wasn't it shared with general cohen at fort hood when it could have stopped the murder of 13 soldiers? jon: a lot of questions there. let's hope you get answers. congressman, thank you. >> i appreciate it. alisyn: here's what is happening now. joint chiefs chairman admiral mike mullen giving a briefing on the wars in iraq and afghanistan and the defense department budget as the military faces questions about the mounting cost of american involvement in the libyan conflict as well. national security correspondent jennifer griffin live from the pentagon for us. jennifer, what did we learn from this briefing? >> reporter: alisyn, he didn't really speak about the libyan conflict for or the cost of it. discussion was with the pentagon
as the leadership in pakistan comes under pressure, it is not able to be fined a safe haven. since the fall in 1991, somalia both now areas of somalia have been the only areas of effective governance. they seek international recognition, but others do not. while they recognize obvious support the eventually integration into greater somalia requires ongoing support. today's hearing offers a valuable opportunity to examine u.s. policy on a variety of issues involving somalia. i'd like to now turn to ranking member, mr. payne, for any comments he might have. >> thank you very. let me thank you for calling the very important joint hearing on assessing the consequences of the failed state of somalia. and it's a pleasure to see my good friend, mr. royce back who chaired the subcommittee at some point in the past and has maintained a strong interest as have congressman smith. and so it's a pleasure to be here at this very important hearing. unfortunately, i will have to leave a few minutes before ii. -- 2:00. i've been invited to be a part of the presidential delegation that will celebrate the new state o
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)